Rebuilding

Four years ago, I started GayMilitary.Net to create a new community for service men and women who were now free to be themselves in their workplace. The repeal of DADT opened the door for many people to open up about their hidden secrets, and gave way for many more to enter the service.

My military initiatives began in 2008 when I started @PTSDsoldiers on Twitter. In 2012, @GLBTmilPTSD came to be. @GayMilitaryNet landed on Twitter in 2013. These were all tied together by my HealthAware US network.

When you create a venture like this, you hope for the best. You want people to sign up and participate. Not much happened. I’ve struggled keeping active users, and am flooded by spam all the time. The Twitter page is so often liked by men with nudity and pornographic material in their profiles, often from foreign lands. I regularly weed out and block those accounts to ensure the GayMilitary.Net experience is not a sex-driven get-together. People, especially gay men, “hook up” quite often, but GayMilitary.Net is not the venue for that.

I’ve given up on using WordPress as a member/user management platform. It works great for a blog, but not for what I envisioned for this site.

So I now present my.GayMilitary.Net. It uses another popular content management system that is much more robust for maintaining user accounts. If you had an existing account on GayMilitary.Net, it’s been migrated to my.GayMilitary.Net with your same username and email address. However, you will need to reset your password.

There are groups for service members (veterans and each branch of the military), and there are groups for civilians (family, friends and supporters). Everyone is invited and welcome to participate. Soldiers are fighting for the rights of civilians, and civilians support those who fight for them. GayMilitary.Net is here to build on that cooperative arrangement.

You can email me at my@gaymilitary.net with any questions, ideas, or suggestions.